Thursday, December 29, 2011

Tim's shirt

I made a shirt for Tim; again Burda 7767 (blush).  And I'm embarrassed to confess that there are still a couple more versions of this in the wings too... sorry!  I hope lots of mens' shirts will not get too repetitive... in my own defence they are all just a leettle bit different from each other in some way.  I hope that is noticeable.
But back to this particular one...
I've noticed that Tim, and lots of young men now, are all wearing their shirts a lot more shrunken in appearance to the classic "men's shirt" silhouette.  More fitted to the body, and with shorter and smaller sleeves.  So I tailored this shirt accordingly; and in case you're wondering, Sam didn't want for his shirt to be "trendy" like this although I actually did make his a little more narrow in the body than previously too.  
I made the sleeves shortish and when he opened his present asked him if he would like them hemmed fashionably even shorter but he said he liked them this length.
I went with snaps for closure, and left off any tabs - there is a good reason for this; below.  The arrowhead pockets and their square-cut flaps are cut with the grain and are matched against the shirt background but with no attempt at fancy bias stuff; again, a perfectly good reason for this is coming right up.
The reason for leaving off my "regular" young mens shirt details? well, to use a technical term... this fabric was a blinkin-nightmare to work with, and almost killed my enthusiasm for men's shirts entirely.  I seem to make a habit of choosing very sewing-unfriendly fabrics (like herefor Tim's shirts but he always professes love for them and wears them a tonne, so in the long run I'm just happy that he is happy!
The problem with the fabric? crinkly and stretchy.  A totally hideous combination for tailoring.  You'd think I'd have learned by now, right?  I always tell myself it will be easier; this time, and then it never is.  My best attempts at making two identical shoulder tabs were so dissimilar I just couldn't put them on the shirt, and just the pockets and pocket flaps were enormously difficult... getting that irregular stretchy check to match up.  I know, sounds ludicrous to say that the humble pocket flap almost defeated me, but there it is.  I even made up a set of pocket flaps and tabs in a different fabric, but decided in the end they just looked wrong.  Honestly Sam's shirt was a walk in the park compared to this one.  I fair dinkum revelled in that non-stretchy fabric!
But this fabric was the stuff I just knew Tim would love in his new shirt, I could just picture him in it, and knew that it would sew up into the kind of cool shirt that he would probably pluck out himself if he spied it in a trendy, young mens' boutique.  So I just had to go carefully and get there in the end, through sheer determination. 
Needless to say there is no flat-felled seaming on this thing.  Raw edges all overlocked, and simply top-stitched down just like that.  And applying the hammer to the shirt when putting in those snaps felt goooood...
And you know what? Got those darn checks to match up, eventually!

11 comments:

  1. Your perseverance paid off in the end, the shirt looks just right. I love your shirts, you always make them look so individual. AND I love your dressmaking details. Keep them coming. Cassie's dress is lovely.

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  2. It's a great shirt despite the pain to get there! You really have your whole family kitted out in some gorgeous gear this Xmas!

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  3. The snaps must have been sweet sweet revenge for this shirt! I love the patience and drive for perfection that you have when making your family's clothes - all of the ones that I have seen so far look absolutely amazing!

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  4. I really hope your family knows how lucky they are, you sew beautifully, the clothes you sew for them are amazing.

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  5. Wow, your children are all so beautiful and how fortunate they are to have a mother with this kind of patience. Great job lady!!

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  6. Though it was a pain for tailoring, I'm loving these cool fabrics you are finding. You should use one or two for yourself! :D

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  7. I'm in love with the fabrics you use, too. You make me want to make mens shirts along with you.

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  8. Despite the technical difficulties, the results are truly awe-inspiring. It's those really pain-in-the-neck fabrics that usually turn out looking amazing.

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  9. You really nailed it when it comes to the current style! I can see my ridiculously picky son choosing a shirt just like this one. I may take a shot at making one for him.

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  10. "crinkley and stretchy"--->this same combo resulted in my almost giving up sewing when first learning a few years ago. Nice shirt and I really like the slimmer silhouette which is fashionable now.

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  11. It looks fantastic on him, you have such lovely taste in fabrics.

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