Friday, July 22, 2011

An ancient xanthorrhoea...

... and me.
We have been busy recently; school holidays and an overseas visitor staying so we have been going sight-seeing.  There is nothing like touring one's own surroundings and talking about local features to make one truly appreciate all over again where you live.  We have been doing lots of Aussie stuff, including a visit to the Perth Mint where we learnt about the Gold Rush and how many of the world's biggest nuggets have been discovered here (most of them); lifted a gold brick (far heavier than I imagined) and learnt about the minting process.  Can you guess the melting point of gold?  Go one, take a minute to guess....


We've visited Kings Park, the beach and gone paddling on the river.  The last few days we have been down visiting my parents in the country.  We cooked damper and billy tea over an open fire out in the middle of the bush, as well as took plenty of photos of kangaroos.  Each of these things we have done lots of times, but have been extra nice when viewed through the enthusiastic eyes of an overseas visitor.  And today we visited a little traditional sweetshop, then I intuitively headed next door to the junk shop to have a trawl through ... I couldn't resist.  I told our visitor she didn't have to come with me but she wanted to!  She found a really old kangaroo print dish and a boomerang shaped leather covered shoe brush, also printed with kangaroos and xanthorrhoea (the plant in my picture above).  I found some more glassware and more old mismatched fine bone china to add to my collection, and a manual typewriter for Craig.  Sam found a double-headed adaptor... er, well, one person's trash etc etc, right?
So everybody scored and everybody's happy!
Finally; the melting point of gold; 1064C...  How close was your guess??


Details:
Top; Ezibuy (the indispensable one with holes in it, gulp!)
Cardigan; MNG Suit, found secondhand
Jeans; Burda 7863 with modifications, black corduroy, details here
Scarf; dark crimson jersey, details here
(old and cruddy) hiking boots; Scarpa

14 comments:

  1. That thing is so so cool!!

    You are the queen of wonderful pants and I covet them all. :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. My guess for melting gold was waaaay off! Enjoy your visitors. Your black cords are great, you are really good at making pants.

    ReplyDelete
  3. That is a beautiful plant! Would it be a tree or a bush, I wonder? :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. What an amazing tree. And what an amazing country you live in.
    Thanks for sharing such wonders.

    ReplyDelete
  5. A cousin of mine and her family have just left Nova Scotia for Perth on a 4 year contract. Imagine moving from a maritime town with a winter low of -30C, summer high of 20C to Perth! I'll keep an eye out for your tourist-type postings to pass on the info to her!

    ReplyDelete
  6. What an interesting tree/bush. Have fun.

    ReplyDelete
  7. WOW that plant is amazing.
    Sounds like your visitor will have a lot of great memories :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. Very politically correct. Can never remember the right name. Taking visitors around is a great way to see your city with fresh eyes. I always hope for sunny days cause Sydney harbor looks sooooo great when it's sunny.

    ReplyDelete
  9. My guess was way out :/ Have a great weekend!

    ReplyDelete
  10. That tree looks very much like it has a wasp nest attached to it!
    .
    Yup Australia and NZ are funny with their different words used for the same item. Here definitely cell phone. We use some northern hemisphere words like duvet not doona.

    ReplyDelete
  11. That tree/bush looks like something out of Dr. Suess! Sounds like you are having a fun time with your visitors.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Sounds like great fun! I'm a bit sad that I didn't get to see the west coast and the bush/outback when I was visiting Australia... but hey, my guess for gold was close, I thought about 1000°C. :)

    ReplyDelete
  13. Amazing tree. I don't think we see them in the east.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Whoa, I was way off on the melting point of gold! Interesting tree...I wonder if it grows anywhere besides Australia.

    ReplyDelete