Thursday, February 24, 2011

Mineral Green socks

How much do my feet hate me right now?  So much, and why? oh let's not get onto the weather again...
Which brings me to this, I apologise for all the whinging yesterday.  I always promised myself I wouldn't whinge about stuff on this blog, and what did I do yesterday?  Whinge.  About the weather, no less!  Sooo trivial... sorry.  A girl is entitled to an off day every once in a while, hm?

So, on to my new sockies.  These are the socks I started knitting in Japan, and have finally finished.  Sam bought this wool for me when he was in Melbourne on his volleyball tour, after I had given him precise directions to the wool shop.  It is just about exactly the colour of all my children's school uniforms, so has traditionally been rather an un-liked colour about this house.  I was a bit surprised that he chose it!
As I've mentioned before, I've always felt knitting my own socks to be quite "worthy" and I feel strangely virtuous that I do this.  I put some more thought into "why" and came up with the following... my family lived through WW2 in London (before my time, obviously), and knitting socks for the troops was in that time and place a very worthy thing to do for the war effort.  All women did it, it was the right and patriotic thing to do and all were proud to be doing it.  It was a highly lauded activity.  After thinking back on it I've realised that this pride in knitting something as basic and necessary as socks is an attitude amongst the females in my family that has subliminally been passed on down to me too.

Details:
Socks; made from Morris Empire Superwash Merino 4 ply in Mineral Green (col 415) with Beluga toes and heels, adapted (as always) from the Ladies Sockette's in Patons Knitting book C11, a circa 1960's publication.
Pussycat; hand-carved by my grandfather

11 comments:

  1. I think your feet deserve a nice soak in an icy bath after that nasty hot photo shoot. Very smart and worthy socks, but I think they will suit your feet better in 3 months or so.
    The pussycat is lovely. Creativeness must run in your family.

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  2. ooh, those look so nice and warm... it is -25C here this morning (not counting wind chill) and woolly socks sound absolutely heavenly...

    re. the gloves---you're welcome. Someone left a link to an actual pattern off the Threads website on one of Laurianna's posts, too, which I'm sure you'll find easily.

    To embed a link you use the html tag for it: < a href=" http://www.linkhere.au ">ClICK HERE< /a> it's a bit cumbersome to type but is nice in the end. Of course I put a bunch of spaces in there that don't belong so it would show up as text, not a link; in reality the only spaces in the tag (between the < and >s) would be the one between a and href. Clear as mud?

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  3. It's a shame it's such a disliked color in your household--it's a very pretty shade of green! Also, that cat is great.

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  4. Ha ha, I googled texas average temps temps too, and it says in College station, where we live, ave low is 74, and average high is 94? (in the heat of summer) what the ...? Not in my yard. Or maybe there is some frigid year somewhere, pulling all the averages down... And in Dallas or Sherman, (we used to live between the two) average low is 71 and 74 in july in August- and ave high 94... I wish!! wish those climate people would send some of those actual temps when the news is reporting 66 consecutive days over 100 degrees (not here, but it happened in Dallas) (But here we had quite a summer a couple of years ago with temps approaching 110 quite a few days) ... so, yeah, whatever google says must be right, but that's not what the thermometer at my house says. We have been in drought conditions tho for a couple of years. I'm hoping those averages really are true because then we are due for a nice cool summer! We sure do have alot of variation in the winter, so here's hoping.

    Hmm, I'm wondering how handknit socks would stand up to athletic endeavors? Yours are cute as always.

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  5. These are such a lovely color. The bit about knitting in WW2 may never have caught on in the USA. The women were "manning" the factories.

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  6. Oooh, the colors! I love how you used different shades of green for these.

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  7. Whinge away about the weather. We all do it from time to time! :)

    Great cozy socks! I've got a pair that have been in my UFO knitting (population: socks), so you're inspiring me to FINISH my pair! I put them away four years ago (cough, cough) after stabbing myself under the fingernails one too many times. Those wee DPNs are sharp!

    I've been busy with my cousin's wedding planning. I'm making her wedding hat by hand and it's taking MUCH longer than I thought it would. (grumble, grumble)

    Hope that Threads glove pattern helps you. The fingers were SUPER long, so be on the watch there.

    BTW: LOVE that cat sculpture! You got the "creative whammy" from all sides of the family tree! You have no choice BUT to create!

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  8. Your feet will be thanking you in a few months. And so will your hands, for that matter.

    Please enlighten me on the fascinating topic of word usage...what is the difference between "whine" and "whinge". "Whinge" is unknown here.

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  9. Thank you!
    Joy - to whinge (rhyming with hinge as in door-hinge) is an Australian colloquialism,meaning to whine or grumble peevishly. Commonly applied here to people who constantly complain about the Australian weather, insects, or for that matter anything else Australian!
    As in "Jeez, what a whinger..."

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  11. Seeing these make me really wish I knew how to knit.
    And as a side note, I can't believe your grandpa made that cat! That's incredible creativity and talent definitely runs in your family, that's for sure.

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